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Reading Kindergarten to G1: Home

Great Authors your child will love

Mo Willems  You can never go wrong with Mo Willems.  He is an American writer, illustrator and Caldecott Award winner.  His popular characters include Elephant and Piggie, Trixie and Knuffle Bunny, and the Pigeon.

Peter Brown is well loved by our youngest readers.  "My Teacher is a Monster" is a universal favorite.  Other titles include "The Curious Garden", "Children Make Terrible Pets" and "Mr. Tiger Goes Wild".  Brown earned a Caldecott Honor for his illustrations in "Creepy Carrots!"

Beginning Reader Series we recommend

Beginning Readers in the library are useful for reinforcing skills children learn in class.  Books with rhyming text, colorful illustrations, and appropriate humor are fun for children to share with their parents at home.  Many of our series include activities to support skills and comprehension. Some of our favorites are:

Usborne Very First Reading - available in both fiction and nonfiction.

Green Light Readers - with activities in the back to support comprehension

Fly Guy - Tedd Arnold's humor appeals perfectly to our youngest readers.

The Magic of Wordless Books

Wordless picture books can be magical to share with your child.  The stories are told entirely through their illustrations.  The best part of sharing a wordless book is that each "reader" can create their own story based on what they see in the illustrations. This activity reinforces that pictures and words work together to tell a story.  This is a fun way to build important literacy skills, including listening skills, vocabulary, and comprehension.  You can also talk about how stories are structured with a beginning, middle, and end.  

How to share a wordless picture books with your child:

  • Keep in mind that each child uses his imagination to create their own story.  There isn't just one way to read a wordless book.
  • It's fun to predict what might happen in the book by looking at the cover and talking about the title.
  • Enjoy the illustrations.  Pay attention to the character's facial expressions, asking "what do you think she feels?"
  • Talk about where the story takes place, and how the setting makes you feel.
  • Take turns telling the story.  Use silly voices and sound effects.  
  • Encourage your child to add more detail by asking probing questions:  Who? What? Where? Why?
  • End your story time together by asking if your child has any connections with the story?  What was her favorite part and why?  What picture was your favorite?

 

Favorite titles for our youngest readers

Zurich International School
Steinarcherstrasse 140
8820 Wädenswil, Switzerland
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